2 Replies Latest reply on May 1, 2008 2:40 AM by phoffmann

    Problem with script distribution

    Rookie

       

      Dears,

       

       

      I have a problem with script and packages distribution. In each locality exists a local server with Windows 2000, and a Core Server with Windows 2003. Now, a local server with Windows 2000 was substituted for a Windows 2003, but the scripts and packages distribution don't working. The IIS (Information Internet Services) was installed and configured, the sharing and web sharing too. Could you help me to configure correctly this server?

       

       

       

       

       

      Thank's

       

       

        • 1. Re: Problem with script distribution
          Expert

           

          What Version of LANDesk are you on? Do you have these servers configured in your Preferred Server list on the Core? Can you access the shares from an interactive DOS prompt using the System Account (http://community.landesk.com/support/docs/DOC-1645)? See this document for Troubleshooting IIS and NTFS permissions...

           

           

          http://community.landesk.com/support/docs/DOC-2587

           

           

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Problem with script distribution
            phoffmann SupportEmployee

            Define also "scripts are not working".

             

            On the Core's "LDMAIN" share, there's a log-file for this kind of thing - the RAXFER.LOG - this tells you the IP-addresses that the Core tried to run actions on. It's a good way to check whether you're talking to the right IP-address.

             

            Furthermore, on the client's "C:\Program Files\LANDesk\Shared Files\"-directory, you'll find SERVICEHOST.LOG - since this is a custom script, there will be entries here (normally) of the type "Core told me to do X" ... or at the very least you'd get an entry about a failed handshake (which indicates certificate problems). If you don't see anything at all in this log (look at time-stamps) then it means the Core never talked to this client, and you've got network issues.

             

            If scripts work for "Computer A" and they work "all the time for Computer A" then the problem isn't with the Core - the tech calling a script is the same after all. Your problem is either network based or certificate based or something is screwy with the client ... the above logs should help you begin figuring out where to look.

             

            Begin with a simple script - one that just calls "NOTEPAD.EXE" or so.

             

            That should help you some of the way.

             

            Paul Hoffmann

            LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead.