1 Reply Latest reply on Aug 16, 2016 7:25 AM by nick.evans

    Cannot EFI PXE Boot a VMware virtual machine after creating a Bare Metal Scan and starting a provisioning task.

    Rookie

      I created a virtual machine using the vSpshere Client ver 6.0. The vm version is 11, the network adapter is the E1000E, and the BIOS is set to EFI. I've added the MAC address to the Bare Metal Server and started a Provisioning Task with the device. The task is at the 'Pending' stage. When I boot the vm, it attempts to boot using the EFI Network but eventually loads the EFI setup. I've added all of the boot options from the EFI setup to no avail. I know that the vm can see the PXE server because I can boot to it when I switch it to use BIOS.

       

      Any ideas are greatly appreciated!

       

      Thanks!

        • 1. Re: Cannot EFI PXE Boot a VMware virtual machine after creating a Bare Metal Scan and starting a provisioning task.
          nick.evans SupportEmployee

          Hi Brandon,

          What version of LDMS are you using?

          Specifically check the Major version and what patches are applied (i.e. 9.6 SP1 Base2015-0506 etc)

          There was a defect where the PXE rep was unable to process the DHCP Discover packet because it has Option 93 set to EFI x86-64 (9)

          Option: (93) Client System Architecture

                  Length: 2

                  Client System Architecture: EFI x86-64 (9)

          This issue was filed as Defect 263510: Certain UEFI devices do not pxe boot.

          This defect was fixed as of patch Base2015-1105

           

          If you are not patched up to at least this level I would start there.

           

          The next thing to make sure, is that UEFI will only boot when you have a template assigned to the bare metal server within the core.

          If you don't assign a template to the device, the core will offer it the F8 menu to boot from, but UEFI cannot handle that option (it's a UEFI design flaw... not something LDMS can control).

           

          If the above is good and you still are having an issue I would do the following:

          Enable pxe logging.

          Run a wireshark on your pxe rep directly to capture pxe boot traffic.

          Review the Core side and PXE side logs to identify that the core gets the pxe request, and what it does when it gets it.

          If you get to this point, you can post the pxe & core logs, and the wireshark and we can try to help review what it's showing.

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