6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 21, 2009 2:02 AM by phoffmann

    My SATA drives show as SCSI

    Jared Barneck SupportEmployee

      Hey,

       

      I am looking for the inventory value that says what drive interface I have.

       

      I see "Computer"."Mass Storage"."Fixed Drive"."Interface Type" but it only shows IDE, USB, SCSI, and all my SATA drives show up as SCSI.

       

      Maybe there is another value I should look at or can we not tell the difference between SCSI and SATA?

        • 1. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
          Apprentice

          I suspect it depends on what the bios setting is. I don't see SATA, but I do see IDE for a system I know to have a single SATA drive, and SCSI for a system I know to have Intel RAIDed SATA drives (it only shows one drive of course, since the OS hasn't a clue what it is). I don't think I have any systems with AHCI on (without the RAID), but I suspect those would still show as SCSI.

          • 2. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
            Rookie

            I have a dual boot system that boots to two different installations of Windows XP. One of the XP systems shows the SATA drives as SCSI and the other shows the drives as SATA. If the bios was controlling this setting, wouldn't both boots show the drives as the same type?

             

            Another piece of the puzzle is that before I recently installed NVidias latest drivers for the SATA disk controller both boots showed the SATA drives as removable IDE drives.

             

            I really don't care how the drives are listed as long as I get the maximum transfer rate for all disks.

            • 3. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
              phoffmann SupportEmployee

              The BIOS setting should only affect "basic" visibility to the OS, not inventory directly. We've not touched DMI in a few years now, and the rest is based on how Windows' WMI sees things ... which is dictated by drivers in most cases.

               

              What it should really come down to is the driver that Windows has loaded for the drive (which may be more or less accurate).

               

              In the dual-boot scenario above, one explanation would be that the specific storage-driver was installed on one installation, but not the other (so Windows can still talk to the drive, thanks to the BIOS having been set to run the SATA drives in a compatibility mode for instance).

               

              99% of this sort of inventory-related stuff is down to drivers, in my experience.

               

              - Paul Hoffmann

              LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead

              • 4. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
                Jared Barneck SupportEmployee

                Well, if there is a way we could tell the difference that would be preferred.

                 

                It sounds like we have a few states for SATA drives:

                 

                SATA acting as SATA

                SATA acting as SCSI

                SATA acting as IDE.

                 

                Be nice if we could make this differenciation somehow so it is easy to query on.

                • 5. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
                  Apprentice

                  Even worse is RAIDed SATA drives. But there doesn't seem to be any way to recognize that without going down to the BIOS level...

                  • 6. Re: My SATA drives show as SCSI
                    phoffmann SupportEmployee

                    carlilek wrote:

                     

                    Even worse is RAIDed SATA drives. But there doesn't seem to be any way to recognize that without going down to the BIOS level...

                     

                    There wouldn't be.

                     

                    a RAID volume is something that's intrinsically "emulated" by the RAID controller. If you have a SCSI RAID volume, you'll see "a RAID volume as presented" and "a RAID controller". The OS won't be able to look at the exact state of the RAID volume, and the only way this is possible is through management software. *SOME* RAID-controllers allow for centralised reporting/messaging when drives go down & co, but it's far from the rule.

                     

                    Once again, we're back to drivers and (for status stuff) any additional software to manage those volumes provided by the RAID-controller vendor. There's no "generic" RAID management that Windows can do per se (I don't treat software RAID as either viable or 'true' RAID - it's a "if needs must" solution for the low-end).

                     

                    - Paul Hoffmann

                    LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead