6 Replies Latest reply on Aug 14, 2009 1:28 AM by phoffmann

    Destination: MBR 0

    Apprentice

      I've made a bunch of images now and deployed them. They've all worked properly (for the most part). I've gotten a strange issue with a Panasonic laptop I've been trying to image. When I run the deploy script on it, the Destination drive it's deploying to is the MBR, instead of C: which it normally is. The image then takes about 3 hours to deploy (usually takes 15 minutes) and when it reboots I get an "Operating system not found" message. Can anyone tell me what is happening, why it's happening and how to fix it?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Destination: MBR 0
          Jason SupportEmployee

          When this is happening open up a new console window)cmd prompt) and launch task manger(taskmgr.exe) and see if services.exe is using a high amount of cpu time. If it is and you are on 8.8 sp2. take a look at this article http://community.landesk.com/support/docs/DOC-5675.

           

          Jason

          • 2. Re: Destination: MBR 0
            phoffmann SupportEmployee

            This will only address part of the problem.

             

            For the original poster in regards to the partition stuff / Master Boot Record stuff:

             

            - By default we ALWAYS try to restore the first partition to MBR 0's entry. It's potentially possible that your laptop already had something on MBR 0 (potentially a hidden service parition).

             

            You may want to have a good look at the hard-drive with DISKPART to see what's going on there. Also, if it's having trouble booting, you just need to set a (and the correct) partition to be ACTIVE (remember, you can ONLY make a primary partition active). The "Active" partition (there can only be one) is the one that'll get booted from (or attempted to).

             

            So you can have situations where "MBR 3" (for instance) is the one marked active, but the OS and co are on MBR 0 (for example), and in this case you'd get into situations such as the above.

             

            It's all stuff you can look at / investigate and fix by some simple use of diskpart .

             

            - Paul Hoffmann

            LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead

            • 3. Re: Destination: MBR 0
              Apprentice

              Ok so I went into diskpart, there was only one disk, as to be expected. So I created a primary partition, set it to active, assigned it a drive letter, then went ahead and tried deploying the image again. Same thing happened. I don't understand why this is only happening with these certain laptops. I found think I found a solution to this, although it is not ideal in the least: I installed a copy of windows 7 first, then deployed the image and it installed fine. This only adds about an hour to the time it takes to image the computer so it is not an acceptable solution. Every other computer we have images just fine, so why are these specifically causing the problems? Is there anything more specific I should try with diskpart?

               

              Thanks.

              • 4. Re: Destination: MBR 0
                phoffmann SupportEmployee

                Well - to be "double safe" you could run DISPART after you've thrown the image on to the hard drive and set the right one active (potentially you should comment out any reboot command for this attempt, and run DISKPART by hand to make sure you can get it right).

                 

                Certainly odd that this is affecting "just this" sort of hardware, no question there.

                 

                I don't see how Windows 7 would change the behaviour, but then I've seen stranger things (so won't question it) .

                 

                - Paul Hoffmann

                LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead

                1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Destination: MBR 0
                  Apprentice

                  Running DISKPART before the image is pushed seemed to make everything work ok. I'd still like to not have to do that, though. If there is any resolution to this please help me out. Thanks.

                  • 6. Re: Destination: MBR 0
                    phoffmann SupportEmployee

                    Truth be told, I don't think there is one.

                     

                    I've no idea *WHY* this is necessary, but I have come accross just this sort of issue for specific hardware models in the past as well. 90% of hardware would work fine - yet the exact same script/image would not create an active partition on "hardware model X".

                     

                    I've no idea if it's to do with the HD-controllers those PC's / laptops use or whatever, but I can tell you that "it does happen". If you've got the time on hand, you can try to root-cause it (good luck with that, though). Alternatively - and this is one of those "IT realities", it may be easier to just bite the bullet and set active partitions.

                     

                    Nothing BAD will happen from setting active patitions by force. Devices that already had it, will keep working just as well, and it'll fix up anything where it wasn't set (whyever they wouldn't set it - go figure).

                     

                    Given the choice between retaining a little of my sanity and bashing my head against a wall, I usually prefer to settle for the "well it works decently now" approach, personally.

                     

                    If you do want to look closer, it'll get interesting - since you might have to talk to anyone from Microsoft (maybe PE doesn't like something about the hardware / drivers used) and/or the various hardware manufacturers. From my own past experience with those sorts of situations this usually is only something you want to use in cases where there's something bugging you in a major way.

                     

                    However, on the other hand, there's a very effective and simple workaround here to be had. So I'd personally go with letting sleeping dogs lie, to be honest. In the end though, your call as always .

                     

                    - Paul Hoffmann

                    LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead