3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 26, 2009 6:29 AM by pettittsa

    Chaining patches and other software

    pettittsa Apprentice

      We are currently planning an upgrade of the software to support our web-based Oracle applications.  At the same time we are going to be upgrading all PCs from IE6 to IE7.  The entire process consists of three separate steps:-

       

      • Install IE7 (using vulscan)
      • Remove all old Java Runtimes (via a batch file deployment)
      • Install JRE 1.6.0 u14 (standard .exe deployment)

       

      Ideally I'd like to use the patching process to install IE7.  There are two reasons for this - 1) it works!  2) Although most PCs have the English version of XP, we also have a number of other languages out there too.

       

      All of these tasks run fine in isolation but the question is, what is the best way to  chain these three processes together?  I'm trying to avoid having to create a customised IE7 installer.

       

      Thanks in advance,

       

      Stephen.

        • 1. Re: Chaining patches and other software
          phoffmann SupportEmployee

          To be honest, I'd always run an IE-update seperately, since not only does it force (not require - force) a reboot, but also just the nature of IE.

           

          IE - in my eyes - is somewhat the same thing from a Microsoft point of view as an OS service pack - a creature in its own right. Also, bear in mind that this (SP-like) forced reboot is not one we can suppress... and this is usually quite bad news for anything else that might be trying to run around that time.

           

          I would certainly be rather wary of chaining anything together with IE.

           

          - Paul Hoffmann
          LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Chaining patches and other software
            Apprentice

            phoffmann wrote:

             

            To be honest, I'd always run an IE-update seperately, since not only does it force (not require - force) a reboot, but also just the nature of IE.

             

            IE - in my eyes - is somewhat the same thing from a Microsoft point of view as an OS service pack - a creature in its own right. Also, bear in mind that this (SP-like) forced reboot is not one we can suppress... and this is usually quite bad news for anything else that might be trying to run around that time.

             

            I would certainly be rather wary of chaining anything together with IE.

             

            - Paul Hoffmann
            LANDesk EMEA Technical Lead

            I disagree.

             

            We do not use Security and Patch manager to deploy IE7 because it does not allow you to customise the IE7 package - e.g branding, proxy settings, security settings etc.  So we use the Internet Explorer Admin Kit http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=36b932c2-a356-4ae5-8c09-1bac9f7a4fe9&displaylang=en

             

            Using the IEAK you can also set the reboot options:reboot, not reboot, prompt the user to reboot.

             

            If you wanted to subsequently install other software, surpressing a reboot would work fine (you could create a custom definition pointing at the customised IE7 package).

             

            You would have to reboot after they are installed however:  If you are using IE6 when installing IE7 silently, you are fine during that browsing session, but if you close the browser, we find you can either not open it again (until you reboot), or it will open but you cannot browse (until reboot).

             

            Let us know if this helps Stephen.

            • 3. Re: Chaining patches and other software
              pettittsa Apprentice

              Thanks for your input.

               

              After discussions here we've gone with Paul's suggestion and are segregating the two parts of the installation.  IE7 will be installed after the Java stuff as a separate process.

               

              Your advise was much appreciated.

               

              Stephen.